Energy is a major requirement for technological growth and other visible development.

But, a major concern is that most civilizations depend solely on fossil fuels for nearly every aspect of their existence.

The use of fossil fuels is known to negatively impact the environment, polluting the air and causing climate change.

As a result, many people are in favour of using renewable energy sources to meet man’s everyday energy needs.

Why do we need renewable energy sources?

Every day, we need electricity to power our computers, TVs, home theatres, phones and other electronic gadgets.

We also need some form of energy to power our vehicles and cook our foods.

If we continue to depend only on fossil fuels as our energy source, we may encounter problems in the future.

Fossil fuels are going to either become exhausted in nature or they will become too expensive to realistically use.

We can’t tell for sure what’s left of this resource, but the fact remains that it is a finite resource. 

In addition, alternative energy resources have a much lighter environmental impact than fossil fuels.

This is why renewable energy sources are our ticket to a less polluted world. 

Even if we did not face the threat of climate change, minimizing pollution is basic for good health.            

Green and Clean: Renewable Energy Sources

Five types of alternative energy are generated by harnessing a natural process, like sunlight or waves. They are generally the most sustainable forms of energy.

Solar Energy

Sunlight is a renewable resource, and its most direct use is achieved by capturing the sun’s energy. 

A variety of solar energy technologies are used to convert the sun’s energy and light into heat.

This heat produces illumination, hot water, electricity and (paradoxically) cooling systems for businesses and industry.

Photovoltaic (PV) systems use solar cells to convert sunlight into electricity. Solar hot water systems can be used to heat buildings by circulating water through flat-plate solar collectors. 

Mirrored dishes that are focused to boil water in a conventional steam generator can produce electricity by concentrating the sun’s heat. 

Commercial and industrial buildings can also leverage the sun’s energy for larger-scale needs such as ventilation, heating and cooling. 

Finally, thoughtful architectural designs can passively take advantage of the sun as a source of light for heating and cooling.

Homeowners, businesses and government entities can take advantage of the benefits of solar power in many ways: 

  1. Install a home solar system or commercial solar panels; construct or retrofit a building to incorporate solar hot water, cooling or ventilation systems; 
  2. Design from scratch structures that take advantage of the sun’s natural attributes for passive heating and lighting.

Learn more about GVE Projects in Bisanti where we used solar energy to power an entire village in Bisanti, Niger State.

Capturing the Wind

Wind can be considered a form of solar energy because it results from the uneven heating and cooling of the atmosphere (as well as the rotation of the earth and other topographical factors). 

Wind flow can be captured by wind turbines and converted into electricity. 

On a smaller scale, windmills are still used today to pump water on farms.

Commercial grade wind-powered generating systems are available to meet the renewable energy needs of many organizations.

Single-wind turbines can generate electricity to supplement an existing electrical supply. 

When the wind blows, the power generated by the system goes to offset the need for utility-supplied electricity.

Utility-scale wind farms generate electricity that can be purchased on the wholesale power market, either contractually or through a competitive bid process.

Geothermal: Power from the Earth

Geothermal energy is derived from the heat of the earth. This heat can be sourced close to the surface or from heated rock and reservoirs of hot water miles beneath our feet.

Geothermal power plants harness these heat sources to generate electricity.

On a much smaller scale, a geothermal heat pump system can leverage the constant temperature of the ground found just 10 feet under the surface to help supply heat to a nearby building in the winter or to help cool it in the summer.

Geothermal energy can be part of a commercial utility energy solution on a large scale or can be part of a sustainable practice on a local level. 

Direct use of geothermal energy may include heating office buildings or manufacturing plants; helping to grow greenhouse plants; heating water at fish farms; and aiding with various industrial processes (e.g., pasteurizing milk).

From Waterwheels to Hydroelectricity

Hydropower isn’t a new invention, though the waterwheels once used to operate the gristmills and sawmills of early America are now largely functioning as historic sites and museums.

Today, the kinetic energy of flowing rivers is captured in a much different way and converted into hydroelectricity. 

Probably the most familiar type of hydroelectric power is generated by a system where dams are constructed to store water in a reservoir which, when released, flows through turbines to produce electricity.

This is known as “pumped-storage hydropower,” where water is cycled between lower and upper reservoirs to control electricity generation between times of low and peak demand.

Another type, called “run-of-river hydropower,” funnels a portion of river flow through a channel and does not require a dam. 

Hydropower plants can range in size from massive projects such as Hoover Dam to micro-hydroelectric power systems.

Direct use of hydroelectric power is naturally dependent on geographic location. 

Assuming a dependable waterway source is accessible and available, micro-hydroelectric plants can be constructed to supply electricity to farm and ranch operations or small municipalities.

Small towns can harness the energy of local waterways by building moderately sized hydroelectric power systems.

Power from the Ocean

There are two types of energy that can be produced by the ocean: thermal energy from the sun’s heat and mechanical energy from the motion of tides and waves.

Ocean thermal energy can be converted into electricity using a few different systems that rely on warm surface water temperatures. 

“Ocean mechanical energy” harnesses the ebbs and flows of tides caused by the rotation of the earth and the gravitational influence of the moon. 

Energy from wind-driven waves can also be converted and used to help reduce one’s electricity costs.

There are also lesser developed technologies that leverage ocean currents, ocean winds and salinity gradients as sources of power conversion.  

Cold ocean water from deep below the surface can be used to cool buildings.

After cooling, desalinated water is often produced as a by-product.

Also, seaside communities can employ the methods to tap natural ocean energy described above to supplement municipal power and energy needs.

Ocean energy is an evolving source of alternative energy production, and with more than 70 per cent of the surface of our planet covered by ocean, its future looks promising, depending on geographies and regulatory guidelines.

Learn more about ocean power on California’s energy web page.

Other Alternative Energy Sources

These two types of renewable energy have to be produced using mechanical means, rather than by harnessing a natural process.

Bioenergy is a type of renewable energy derived from biomass to create heat and electricity or to produce liquid fuels such as ethanol and biodiesel used for transportation.

Biomass refers to any organic matter coming from recently living plants or animals. 

Even though bioenergy generates about the same amount of carbon dioxide as fossil fuels, the replacement plants that are grown as biomass remove an equal amount of CO2 from the atmosphere.

This keeps the environmental impact relatively neutral or minimal.

There are a variety of systems used to generate this type of electricity, ranging from directly burning biomass to capturing and using methane gas produced by the natural decomposition of organic material.

How is bioenergy used? Businesses or organizations that transport goods or people can convert their fleets to vehicles that use biofuels such as ethanol or biodiesel.

Manufacturing facilities can be equipped to burn biomass directly to produce steam captured by a turbine to generate electricity.

In some cases, this process can have a dual purpose by powering the facility as well as heating it. 

For example, paper mills can use wood waste to produce electricity and steam for heating. 

Farm operations can convert waste from livestock into electricity using small, modular systems.

Towns can tap the methane gas created by the anaerobic digestion of organic waste in landfills and use it as fuel for generating electricity.

Hydrogen: High Energy/Low Pollution

Hydrogen is the simplest (comprised of one proton and one electron) and most abundant element in the universe, yet it does not occur naturally as a gas on earth. 

Instead, it is found in organic compounds (hydrocarbons such as gasoline, natural gas, methanol and propane) and water (H2O). 

Hydrogen can also be produced under certain conditions by some algae and bacteria using sunlight as an energy source.

Hydrogen is high in energy yet produces little or no pollution when burned.

Liquid hydrogen has been used to launch space shuttles and other rockets into orbit since the 1950s. 

Hydrogen fuel cells convert the potential chemical energy of hydrogen into electricity, with pure water and heat as the only byproducts.

However, commercialization of these fuel cells as a practical source of green energy will likely be limited until costs come down and durability improves.

Almost all the hydrogen used in the United States is used in industry to refine petroleum, treat metals, produce fertilizer and process foods. 

In addition, hydrogen fuel cells are used as an energy source where hydrogen and oxygen atoms are combined to generate electricity.

There are also currently a few hundred hydrogen-powered vehicles operating in the United States, a number that could increase as the cost of fuel cell production drops and the number of refuelling stations increases.

Other practical applications for this type of renewable energy include large fuel cells providing emergency electricity for buildings and remote locations, electric motor vehicles powered by hydrogen fuel cells and marine vessels powered by hydrogen fuel cells.

By Clean Technology Hub Executive Director Ifeoma Malo and Senior Analyst Wole Hammond  

The economic development of communities is heavily dependent on energy access; however, many rural settlements remain unconnected to the national electric grid.

Onono-Anam in Anambra State, Nigeria is one such community, where the lack of electricity has adversely affected the social, health and economic life of the inhabitants of this community who are largely smallholder farmers and petty traders.

Only a handful of the 500 homes in this rural community can afford small generators to meet some of their energy needs, whilst the other inhabitants mainly rely on smoky kerosene lamps and fuel wood.

However, the launch of a 24kW solar mini-grid in 2016 ushered a new era of unlimited power supply which culminated in improved socio-economic well being for Onono-Anam. Several homes are now powered by solar energy; agro-processing now thrives in the community, and night time security has been enhanced.

Over 50 direct and indirect jobs have been created during the project implementation, alongside knowledge transfer, as some of the inhabitants are still involved in post-installation operations. The positive impact of this project has resulted in the installation of an additional mini-grid to serve an additional 300 households in Onono and surrounding communities of Okpechalla, Atachile and Okilo.

Energy access for improved health

Up North in Bisanti, Niger state, the installation of a 40kW solar mini-grid was made possible through a partnership with the Bank of Industry, the United Nations Development Program, and the Institute of Electrical Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

This mini-grid installation has been of immense benefit to the community. Over 300 households and approximately 1,600 people are now connected to the grid. Residents who ran petrol-powered generators for as much as N600 naira for 3 litres could now access 24-hour power supply for 44.5% for that same amount.

Security and social interactions also have greatly improved, and the Primary Healthcare Centre in the community has recorded a 60% reduction in malaria cases in the community.

Many of the residents in this community attest to improvements in their health and well-being as they can use electric fans to sleep comfortably at night despite the heat and humidity synonymous to the region. The local economy has further blossomed as 35 micro, small and medium enterprises have been connected to the mini-grid, and farmers can now irrigate rice farms and earn more money.

The overarching desire of Green Village Electric Projects Limited is to see economic growth and improved social well-being in communities, without compromising environmental sustainability.

In Akpabom, Akwa Ibom State where a 100kW mini-grid was installed, sponsored by the Rural Electrification Fund and All On, businesses and can now run for longer with reduced cost often spent in the past on diesel or petrol for generators. Energy-related spend is now down by 40%.

As a coastal settlement, Akpabom’s fishermen have reduced post-harvest loss as the uninterrupted power supply avails them the opportunity to preserve fishes thereby yielding more income.

The social impact of the projects has resulted in improved quality of life. In Akpabom, there is a 68% downfall in malaria cases experienced in the community, and children could study and play more with the help of street lighting.

Goal: clean and affordable energy for all

As an industry leader, Green Village Electric (GVE) Projects Limited is at the forefront of providing clean and sustainable energy solutions to unserved and underserved rural communities. They also offer off-grid renewable energy solutions to commercial users – such as healthcare, agro-businesses – and residential users. GVE Projects has grown from a student-led idea in 2009 to a company with a staff strength of over 40 employees, serving over 8,984 households across the nation.

The company recently signed the first interconnected mini-grid tripartite agreement in Africa with the Abuja Electricity Distribution Company Plc and Wuse Market Association to Develop a 1MW PV Solar Hybrid system for Wuse Market, Abuja – Nigeria.

Through seed funding, grants, equity/debt financing by organisations such as the IEEE, USADF, USAID, GE Africa, European Union, All On, Rural Electrification Agency/Rural Electrification Fund, UNDP, and the Bank of Industry, GVE has successfully implemented 13 mini-grid projects across the country with new projects in the pipeline Plateau, Rivers, Kogi, Anambra and the FCT.

GVE hopes towards achieving SDG7 – affordable and clean energy for all – while putting smiles on people’s faces, this they have been doing across various communities like Bisanti, Kolwa, Onono, Kolaku, and Egbeke. The company’s target is to serve 3.6 million people in Nigeria and expand into the West African market over the next few years.

Source: https://www.esi-africa.com/industry-sectors/renewable-energy/it-takes-a-global-community-to-create-energy-access-for-all/

Approved by GVE-GROUP